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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)
roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i was betting against roberts, too. then what would have happened is that somebody else would have stepped up. i think that roberts is different in some ways. he is much more polished in dealing with his cons
are there in the united states? >> that's very hard. you so take attendance everyday. but we estimate about 58,000. something in that area. >> 58,000. and one of the things that we're here to -- dr. snider is going to help us with is there are conversations and images of sisters of nuns how have we seen them? what are the roles today? and internationally what are the questions they're engaged in within the catholic church. stay with us. we'll be right back. ,,,, . >> dr. sandra snyder of the jesuit school in berkeley. a joy to have you. we're going to talk in this segment about religious life. the religious life really goes back to the first century. let's skip the first 17 centuries of that and take us to western europe and what happens with immigration of into the united states and how that affects the sisters and the images that people have. >> all right. go back a little bit further than that. in the 1600s, 1700s. so the first time -- actually a little bit before that. the sisters who were nuns who were cloistered who entered their religious communities did not come out. did not have exter
, the ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my first substantive substantive sentence to him was mr. president, you know i'm not in politics for s-sierra. you know i'm going to read this but can criticize you. he said that's fine. i know you'll criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know in the past you criticized my father's policy, but you are always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him, you know, mr. president, one of the worst things you ever did? with that? said he let it be known that you like phil collins music, the rocks
gets arrested for his activities. he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states in deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north koreans. you cannot possibly read this book without being profoundly moved without frankly been moved to tears and just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible. we will go into greater detail in some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, i'm jay lefkowitz will introduce shortly uses the best of her journalist sensibilities honed in three decades at "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of the tragedy of north korea and we are deeply proud and we look forward to her comments today. copies of "escape from north korea" are available for purchase at today's event for $20 melanie curt -- it would be glad to send your copy. it's also available at amazon.com. buy your shallow view another online booksellers to read it, discuss it and read it again. i now have a special pleasure of introducing my friend, jay lefkowitz. shea is a senior partner at kirkland and alice here in new york city. jay is a w
with that, i want to introduce you to the united states attorney, who is melinda haig, who is going to say some words to you. thank you. [ applause ] >> wow. you guys really are happy to be out of school. so nice to see all of you, as richard said, good morning everyone. as richard said my name is melinda haigh, the united states attorney for the northern district of border to monterey and our office is just a couple of blocks away in san francisco. [ applause ] so we love it here. many of you probably don't know what the united states attorney is or what they do or anything like that, but i was nominated by president obama to be the united states attorney here two years ago. yes, my boss. [ applause ] and i'm honored to represent him, the president, the administration and the department of justice in northern california and in san francisco and in that capacity to welcome you here today to see this movie screening. there are 800 san francisco public high school students here today. so thank you for being here. [ applause ] it's really amazing. really amazing. there are 2400 of your cla
a distinguished career in publish service as a lawyer in arkansas, as a first lady of the united states and more recently as the united states senator from the state of new york. she not only has the highest approval rating of any member of the u.s. cabinet, she has as well topped the gallop poll for 16 years as the most admired woman in the world besting the previous record of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we are extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant who is engaged in these challenges day in and day out, who cares deeply about the issues and how they effect america's interest and who believes in a brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming the secretary of state, the honorable hillary clinton. [applause] >> thank you. thank you all. thank you very much and a special word of thanks to a friend and someone whom i admire greatly. his many years of distinguished service to our country is a great tribute in every respect. thanks also to john and csis for hosting this conferenc
for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on monday mitt romney set out his foreign policy plank. in eight days mitt romney and president obama will debate foreign affairs. we will ask the terrific panel what to make of romney's foreign policy. >>> next up, "argo," the amazing little known story of six americans who actually escaped from the embassy in tehran in 1979 and eventually got out of the country. i'll talk to the man at the cia who masterminded the operation. ben affleck plays him on the big screen, but you get the real version with us. >>> finally, drew foust, the president of harvard, on how the civil war changed america. >>> also, do you feel guilty take dagg off from work? don't. it's probably good for your country. i'll explain. >>> but first here's my take. recently intelligence squared a feisty forum in new york debated the proposition better elected islamists than dictators, referring to the choices confronting america in the middle east. the lead
immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you come to the united states? >> i came to united states in 1985. >> how old were you? >> in may of 1985, i
this has citizens, i live in europe, you live in the united states of america and we all know the problem we have with our democracies now is not the decision of religions, but some decisions of transnational cooperation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to do anything. in democracy we are still dealing with powers that are beyond the democracy procedure. banks, transnational corporations, and we're facing with people are deciding. in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats are coming to solve the problem. we never elected them. but money is choosing them. so we also have to deal with the simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from state, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on the state which is also imposing decision on to us as citizens. so this idealization of the western democracy model i would say be cautious. we all have to do with problems and prices from within. so i wouldn't push the arab world to follow blindly the western model, but to be very critical and to try to take the best from the other models into dra
. and make no mistake about it, the city and county of san francisco are supporter of the united states military. san francisco fleetwood association is a nonprofit all volunteer organization that was formed to help organize and execute fleet week. and fleet week in 2012 like 2011 and 2010 has adopted a mission to promote the humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions of the united states military. we also, of course, will have the blue angels and the air show that comes with that. the ships will be coming in and the wonderful liberty call that the wonderful men and women in the armed forces will have in san francisco. the fleet week association also, as i say, has a humanitarian and response. along with the civilian disaster response community, we'll have a senior leader seminar taking place on thursday and friday in which the military and the civilian community learn from one another on how to provide disaster response. i should mention that on wednesday morning out at ocean beach, the marine corps and the navy are setting up what's called the shock trauma platoon, a field
is inconceivable that the president of the united states was unaware of the facts that were obvious to the intelligence community. how could he have not known and if he didn't know, who kept that information from him? >> governor, that is the duty of inquiry. you ran a government. you understand and i think particularly where there is notice and now you should be getting real time reports from that -- that give accurate and actual information. this is the same paradigm we are seeing i fast and furious e the response is well, we didn't know anything about it. and you can't be able to be held unaccountable because you choose not to listen to those who have information to bring to you. and i'm being kind when i say choose not to listen. i think there is a duty of inquire arery. there is a duty of responsibility when something that significant that had to be one of the most important things the federal government was is responding to at that moment and for them to say that they aren't aware of the circumstances suggests one of two things. either incompetentence or are misrepresentation
handling of the 9/11 attack in libya? >> when the vice president of the united states directly contradicts the testimony, sworn testimony, of state department officials, american citizens have a right to know just what's going on. and we're going to find out. >> we cover it all this morning with our own debate. joining the conversation, virginia's republican governor bob mcdonnell. former democratic governor of michigan jennifer granholm. atlanta's democratic mayor kasim reed. republican strategist alex castellanos. and nbc's tom brokaw. >>> and later, politics, satire, and lots of laughs. i go one-on-one with stephen colbert. in character -- >> i don't really watch the news so much. i come in around 6:30 and i just say the opposite of whatever rachel maddow says the night before. and comedy just helps an idea go down. that's all. and it just makes you listen for a minute. >>> from nbc news in washington, "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> good sunday morning. it is a critical time in the race for the white house now. over the next eight days, think about it, we'll see the final two
attack in the united states last year. talk about credibility. when this administration says all options are on the table, they send all these mixed signals. in order to solve this peacefully, you have to have the ayatollahs change their minds. look at where they are. it is because this administration has no credibility on this issue. this administration watered down sanctions. now we have been in place because of congress. the military option is not being viewed as credible. make sure we have credibility. under a romney administration, we will have credibility. >> incredible. do you think there is any possibility the entire world would have joined us? russia and china? these are the most crippling sanctions in the history of sanctions. period. when the governor is asked about it, he said, we have to keep the sanctions. you're going to go to war? the interesting thing, how are they going to prevent war? saye is nothing more they'd we should do than what we have already done. with regard to the ability of the united states to take action militarily, it is not in my purview to talk about c
established a colony in mexico. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> narrator: miles romney had five wives and 30 children. >> they built a ranch and he's back in stone age conditions with no money. romney's father is now on the scene. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the
ambassador to the united states. >> i don't know who informed her. that is the investigation and we are going to have to find out who told what to whom and when? and were they giving political coverage, or just misinformed. it is bound to be a loser for them. congressman, you get the last word. >> the administration was in contact with the embassy in tripoli and they knew it a terrorist attack and they sceep seem to be a trying to find a scapegoat. hopefully hillary clinton will not be. i think the american people want to know why they were misled and that's the over liing question. >> where were they misled? >> it is presidential politics trying to make the president look better. but look at his policy. they don't want to use the word terrorism and stripped all of the words of terrorism and jihad out of the lexicon in the national counter terrorism and pentagon and is this a doning tread ertrend with the administration. >> it was. and i got to leave it there. >> it was doubly stupid. congressman thank you. thank you, ab. and just back from lib [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some pe
good job at being president of the united states. i've been an entrepreneur my entire life. two-term governor of new mexico, i think successfully at that. and the differences between myself and other candidates, look, let's not bomb iran, let's get out of afghanistan now. bring the troops home. i think that marriage equality is a constitutionally guaranteed right. let's end the drug wars, legalize marijuana now. i would have never signed the national defense authorization act. i would repeal the patriot act. i think that we need to balance the federal budget now, or we're going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse. and let's abolish the irs and eliminate income tax and corporate tax. we'll reboot the american economy tens of millions of jobs get created in a zero corporate tax rates environment. jill, starting with you, if you can stick to a minute, how would you fix the struggling economy? >> well, we think this doesn't need to be guesswork. we have experience creating jobs in the worst economy the country has ever known during the great depression. we created jobs by direc
and other countries to come back into the united states. that makes sense. but the best thing to do is to reform medicare. >> vice president go, two minutes. >> all right, here we go again. now look, if you want someone who will spend a lot of words describing a whole convoluted process and then end up supporting legislation that is supported by the big drug companies, this is your man. if you want someone who will fight for you and who will fight for the middle-class families and working men and women, w are sick and tired of having their parents and grandparents pay higr prices for prescription drugs than anybody else, then i want to fight for you. and you asked a great question because it's not only seniors. listen, for 24 years i have never been afraid to take on the big drug companies. they do some great things. they discover great new cures and that's great. we want them to continue that. but they are now spending more money on advertising and promotion. you see all these ads? than they are on research and development. and they are trying artificially extend the monopoly paten
and more interested in getting to the bottom of this than the president of the united states. he feels personal responsibility for every representative he sends around the world. he knew christevens. he admired chris stevens. so look, we want to get to the bottom of it and the first order of business is to bring to justice those who committed this heinous pant an act and sy find out what adjustments need to be made to further secure our diplomats around the world. >> chris: does the president take personal responsibility rest.e fact that rest. petersburged requests for -- repeated requests for more security were made and rejected. does he take personal responsibility for that? >> at the topline level the president of the united states is responsible for everything that happens on his watch. these were judgments made by the security folks at the state department and, of course, we are going review that whole process and see how those decisions are made and why those decisions were made and how we adjust in the future to make sure that we are giving our diplomats the maximum protection w
in getting to the bottom than the president of the united states, he feels personal responsibility for every representative he and ends around the world and he knew chris stevens, he admired chris stevens, so, look, we want to get to the bottom of it and the first order of business is to bring to justice those who committed the heinous act and, secondly, find out what went wrong and what adjustments need to be made to further secure our diplomats around the world. >> chris: let me ask you directly, does the president take personal responsibility for the fact that repeated requests for more security were made, and were rejected and that that may have contributed to the death of those four americans? does he take personal responsibility for that? >> chris, at the to say line level the president of the united states is responsible for everything that happens under his -- on his watch. these were judgments that were made by the security folks at the state department and, of course we will review that whole process and see how those decisions are made, why those decisions were made, and, how we a
this aside. when the vice president of the united states directly contradicts the testimony -- sworn testimony of state department officials, american citizens have a right to know just what's going on. >> let's take this from a political point of view. the vice president said in that debate we didn't know they wanted additionasecurity in libya. the white house then says, well, we didn't -- by we, we mean the president and the vice president. is that adequate for a president of the united states or the vice president of the united states to look at the destinies for americans is and say, well, we didn't know they needed more security? >> well, candy, obviously there's a whole bunch of stuff impact this question. first and foremost, nobody wants to get to the bottom of exactly what happened more than this president and this administration. i would say a couple of things. security requests at our embassies and consulates and our buildings throughout the world obviously go to the state department. that's -- those are the people that should be making those decisions. that's the place whe
. the people that work in washington, d.c. for the u.s. congress or the united states senate. get a variety of choices to make in their lives. and that's what we ought to do for all people in america. >> yes, sir, sorry. >> follow-up? >> trying to find my light. >> not right now. education. these folks submitted 18 questions on education, and the first one is that will be asked on education will go to you, governor, and asked by angie pettig. angie pettig, where are you? there she is, governor, right there. >> i've heard a lot about education and the need to hold teachers and schools accountable, and i certainly agree with that. but as an individual with an educational background, and also a parent, i have seen a lot of instances where the parents are unresponsive to the teachers or flat out uninvolved in their child's education. how do you intend to not only hold the teachers and schools accountable but also hold parents accountable? >> well, you know, it's hard to make people love one another. i wish i knew the law because i would darn sure sign it. i wish i knew the law that said all of
calculated we are most per capita spend city in the united states. that's point one which will reflect the fact we are a community supporting arts. we have introduced, as the first city in the united states, neighborhood cultural centers, as a reflection of not only dealing with art, but making sure that art is focused in the neighborhoods. we really want our community to have the opportunity to participate, to deal with, and actually to become involved with art development. recently the city has found its way to make sure that at least 2% of every new construction in city buildings is preserved for art. and this is kind of an extraordinary thing for a city of our size to do. as a result, we have a wide array of lots of cultural and artistic venues for people to take advantage of. >> i wanted to let sfgtv, we have a powerpoint. >> yes, we do. but i'm not quite ready to use it yet but i will hit that button in just a moment. thank you for reminding me. the reputation and promise of the arts commission has been tarnished recently. and i think by looking at our report and reading it, you
limits for members of the united states congress. i believe it would return the government closer to the people, in a way that ross perot is talking about. the president's terms are limited to two -- a total of eight years; what's wrong with limiting the terms of members of congress to 12? congress has gotten kind of institutionalized, for 38 years one party has controlled the house of representatives and the result, a sorry little post office that can't -- you know, can't do anything right and a bank that has more overdrafts than all the chase bank and citibank put together. we've got to do something about it and i think you get a certain arrogance -- bureaucratic arrogance -- when people stay there too long. and so i favor -- strongly favor -- term limits. and how to get them passed? send us some people that'll pass the idea. and i think you will, i think the american people want it now. every place i go i talk about it and i think they want it done. actually, you'd have to have some amendments to the constitution because of the way the constitution reads. >> thank you. governor
prescription drugs taken by patients in the united states every year. it's big business, has little oversight, and it impacts all of us. you work here? >> i'm security for the facility. >> reporter: all week we've tried to dig up anything about how it could have become so deadly. >> unfortunately i have to ask you guys to lead the property. >> reporter: no one here really wants to talk. >> your call has been forwarded to an automatic. >> the number you dialed is not in service. >> your call has been forwarded to an automatic voice system. >> hello. >> hello. i'm trying to get ahold of barry cadden. that one, wrong number. is there someone we can talk to? i even went straight to the home of barry cadden. he's the owner of the facility. there was a car parked at the end of the driveway. no visitors allowed. i would told they would call back. they didn't. we were tipped off about a recycling facility that shares space. it's literally in the backyard. it's literally a garbage dump. we saw a truck bringing waste from a nursing home to be deposited here. while there's no law with a compounding agen
be president of united states. that is what we're focused on, beating barack obama. >> i wanted to change focus a little bit and talk about the upcoming lame duck session. before you left to campaign, congress passed a continuing resolution that funds the government into next year. one of the purposes was so that tough decisions could be made on the so-called fiscal cliff during the lame duck. it seems we're hearing that congress is going to punt on the lame duck and of the fiscal clip issues and not tackle the upcoming sequestration. i have a two-part question. do you think that is looking more likely? how will lawmakers explained that one for months we have had this buildup that if we do not do something in december bad things will happen? >> it all depends on who wins the election. it mitt romney wins and if we get 50 votes in the senate, in a sense to wait until we have a president romney and to have a republican consultant and things richer actively. you would get a better deal for the american people. there are now accountable to the voters. if we win, the strategy makes sense. if not, al
of political partisanship or when the current president of the united states of america is still questioned despite the hard-and-fast evidence of his long form birth certificate, then we know we are engaging in post truth politics. even when we fact check one another, we still do not believe the evidence. not that we shall not be beholden to fact checkers reins supreme. robust debate is reduced to discussion about what counts as real, credible or verifiable. vice president biden delivered it directly on thursday. >> look, folks, use your common sense. who do you trust on this? a man who introduced a bill to raise it $6400 a year knowing it and passing it and romney saying he signed it or me and the president? >> that's what it boils down to. not whose policies are best. but who do you think is telling the truth? after the first presidential debate last week, many fact checkers worked overtime trying to untangle many of governor romney's statements. but perhaps the efforts were in vein as conservative king maker, karl rove pointed out alleging that romney is a serial deceiver is a hard sell.
including the united states navy surgeon general. on friday we have former secretary of defense perry who will be speaking. and on friday, as is tradition, since we saw the program, we invite the neighborhood volunteers, the nerts volunteers, people who volunteer their time to learn how to save their neighbors. so, we bring them on board and include them in the program. they get a nice tour of the ship. we feed them a will youctionvv of. fleet week always has a luncheon attached to it. i think everybody will remain, if you have any questions, want to talk to anybody more about the fleet week program, thank you very much, mayor lee. thank you, city and county of san francisco. and thank you all for coming out. (applause) >> hello, i am with the recreation and parks department. we are featuring the romantic park location in your backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in santa and cisco with someone special. -- san francisco with someone special. our first look out is here at buena vista park, a favorite with couples and dog walkers. both have a significant force. a refreshing retr
, president kennedy pledged the united states would not invade cuba and would withdraw its medium-range nuclear missiles from turkey. it appeared the moment of danger had passed. but new documents shortly to be published from the archives of christoph's deputy during the crisis tell a different story. this woman describes the contents. >> what these declassified documents show is the cuban missile crisis it entered a new stage of crisis. we know now the soviet union delivered not only strategic missiles to cuba, medium-range missiles to cuba, but also over 100 tactical nuclear weapons. and these weapons were not covered by the agreements between kennedy and khrushchev. >> the agreement between washington and moscow came after the most critical day of the crisis, known as black saturday. >> black saturday, october 27, was the peak of the crisis. both kennedy and khrushchev felled the situation -- felt the situation was slipping out of control and they had to do something to end the crisis. one that -- one u2 was shot down. in the caribbean, the u.s. was trying to bring out soviet s
that the president of the united states did not know, beforehand, about this problem and the vice president of the united states did not know. now he is a key guy in national security. secondly, what about the national security council? did the state department inform their counterparts on security look we are getting complaints about benghazi? this whole thing this whole rotten can needs to be opened up. >> i'm calling this a scandal. it is a scandal of lax security at our consulate in benghazi is it waxing or wanning? >> it is under investigation. the worst scenario, pat is did not come true. >> what does that mean? >> i don't know. >> more inflamed, pat. >> basically, it is bleeding. >> bleeding, that is pretty good. >> is it a question of what the nation's attention span is for foreign policy. this is a big deal, four people were killed. there is a really good chance we are going to be hearing more about this. the senate is going to have its own investigation after the election. the democrats are unking things over there and they don't want it to infear with the election. there are goin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)

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